Counseling Department

 

 

NAMEPOSITIONALPHAEMAIL (@ops.org)PHONE #
Gregor, MaureenDirector of CounselingH, Wmaureen.gregor531-299-7708
Lagana, LauraRecordsG, K, X, Zlaura.lagana531-299-7698
Carlson, SteveCareerRsteven.carlson531-299-7718
Herrera, EmilioSocial Worker emilio.herrera531-299-7705
Pla, JorgeCollegeB, N, Tjorge.pla-redondo531-299-8865
Branson, SilinaCareerD, L, Mc, Usilina.branson531-299-8823
Perez, AntonioCollegeC, E, Qantonio.perez531-299-7682
Tran, ThangCareerI, J, S, Ythang.tran531-299-9043
Synowiecki, MichelleSocial/EmotionalF, O, Pmichelle.synowiecki531-299-7668
Villafuerte, JenniferSecretary jennifer.villafuerte531-299-7665
Green, LaJoyCollegeMlajoy.green531-299-7709
Vidal, RachelleRecordsA, Vrachelle.vidal531-299-7666
Adams, KayletaSchool Psychologist kayleta.adams531-299-7727
Harriet BarnesSecretary harriet.barnes531-299-7722
Melissa HillBilingual Liason melissa.hill531-299-7704

 

The School Counseling Program in the Omaha Public Schools encompasses preschool through twelfth grade.


Vision

 Every Student. Every Day. Prepared for Success.

 Mission  

Omaha Public Schools prepares all students to excel in college, career and life.

Commitment

1. Every student will be assigned a school counselor who will provide the personal support needed to set goals to achieve social competence and academic success.

2. Every student will be empowered to gain the attitude, knowledge and skills necessary for lifelong academic, career, and personal success.

3. Every student will be provided a system of support to address immediate needs and concerns impacting school success.

Focus

School counselors prepare students to excel in college, career and life by instilling hope, increasing school connectedness and empowering students to achieve academic success. (Hope. Connect. Succeed.)

ASCA/NDE School Counseling Standards

Confidentiality
  • Everything that is shared with a counselor is considered to be confidential. In other words, the counselor will not tell anyone what has been discussed without the student's permission unless the student is dangerous to his/her self or to others.  
The Role of the School Counselor
  • Through large and small group presentations, academic, personal/social, and career counselors deliver a couseling curriculum to ALL students related to the four program strands: self and opportunity awareness, social responsibility and awareness, goal setting and decision making, and preparation for transitions. In addition, all the counselors assist individual students who have unique needs, including those who may be experiencing barriers to academic success. Also, every high school has a specialized counselor to assist students with their advanced education plans. 
 Counselor Domains
      • Records Counselor monitors student academic placement and academic progress toward meeting South High graduation requirements.
      • College/Career Counselor assists students in the identification of skills and talents related to classes and possible future employment opportunities.
      • Social/Emotional Counselor interacts with students who need assistance with relationships, conflict resolution, and personal issues related to wellness.
    When Can Students Reach a School Counselor?
    • The Counseling Department is open Monday through Friday from 7:10 AM to 3:45 PM.
    • Students can come to the Counseling Center before school, during study halls, lunch period, and after school. However, in the case of an urgent situation, teachers may choose to send a student to see a counselor during class time. Students should come to the Counseling Center from class or study hall with a pass.
    How Can Parents/Guardians Reach a School Counselor?
    • Parents/Guardians may reach a school counselor by calling the Couseling Office at 531-299-7665 or 531-299-7722 or come directly to the Couseling Office. If parents/guardians have question about a student's schedule, classes, or educational plan, the student's assigned counselor is available to talk with them.

     

    High School Graduation and College Entrance Considerations

     

    Credits:

    1 credit = 1 class/period passed each semester (No credit for Study Hall)

     

    Graduation Requirements (From OPS):

           English                    8

           Social Studies         7 (US History 1-2; World Geography; Economics;                                     World History 1-2; American Government)

           Math                       6

           Science                   6 (Biology 1-2; Chemistry 1-2; Physics 1-2)

           PE/HROTC             4

           Human Growth        1

           Electives                 17 (Consider education plans and interest)

           Total Credits            49 Required for all OPS High Schools

     

    College Entrance Requirements:

    (University of Nebraska System)

    Class                                 Years           Requirements include

    English                              4 years         Fulfilled by OPS requirements

     

    Social Studies                    3 years         Fulfilled by OPS requirements

     

    Math                                  3 years          Algebra 1-2, Geometry, Algebra 3-4

    UNL – One additional year of math beyond Alg. 3-4

     

    Science                              3 years         Fulfilled by OPS requirements

     

    International Language     2 years        

              Both years in same language – some colleges may require more

              (3 years recommended)

     

     

    What can you do now?

          Encourage your student to do his/her best in school

          Encourage your student to take high academic courses (honors/AP)

          Encourage your student to be involved in activities

          Talk with your student about his/her educational future now

          Stay involved in your child’s education – communicate with the school


    Graduación de Secundaria y Entrada Colegial Consideraciones

     

    Créditos:

     1 crédito = 1 clase/período pasado cada semestre (No hay crédito por studio de Vestíbulo)

     

    Requisitos de graduación (De OPS) :

    • Inglés                              8

    • Estudios Sociales            7 (Historia Estadounidense 1-2; Geografía Mundial;      Economía; Historia Mundial 1-2; Gobierno Norteamericano)

    • Matemáticas                    6

    • Sciencia                          6 (Biología 1-2; la Química 1-2; Física 1-2)

    • PE/HROTC                     4

    • Crecimiento Humano       1

    • Electivas                         17(Consideracion de planes educativos e interés)

    • Creditos totales              49 Requeridos para todas las Secundarias de OPS

     

    Requisitos para ingreso al Colegio:

    (Sistema de La universidad de Nebraska)

    Clase                                 Años             Requisitos incluyen

    Ingles                                4 años          Cumplidos con requisitos de OPS

     

    Estudios Sociales              3 años          Cumplidos con requisitos de OPS

     

    Matematicas                      3 años          Algebra1-2, Geometría, Algebra 3-4

    UNL – Un año adicional de matemáticas despues de Algebra 3-4

     

    Sciencia                            3 años          Cumplidos con requisitos de OPS

     

    Idioma internacional          2 años

    Ambos años en el mismo idioma – algunos Colegios pueden requerir más

    (3 años recomendados)

     

    ¿Qué puede hacer usted ahora?

    • Apoyar a su estudiante a hacer su major esfuerzo en la escuela

    • Apoyar a su estudiante a tomar cursos académicos altos (honores/AP)

    • Apoyar a su estudiante a participar en actividades

    • Hable con su estudiante en cuanto a su futuro educacional ahora

    • Permanezca implicado activamente en la educación de su hijo(a) – comuniquese          con la escuela

     

     

     

     

    NAVIANCE

    Naviance Family Connection is the computer based program that will be utilized by South High to communicate numerous scholarship options for OPS seniors.  Click on the 'college' tab to view the district scholarship list at the bottom of the page.  Access Naviance Family Connection via the front page of the South High website - click on the icon that says Naviance.  A student's username is his or her 6 digit student ID number; the password is his or her 8 digit birthday.  Students are encouraged to change their password each semester by clicking on 'manage my account' at the top of the page.

     

     

     To request your official transcript, please contact jeraldine.rodriguezordonez@ops.org or call 531-299-7677.

     Please provide her the following:

    1.  First and Last Name
    2. Graduation Year
    3. Birth Date
    4. Where the transcript can be sent

    Transcripts are not able to  be given directly to the student.

    Academic Support 

    South Teachers and Staff are available in the Library to help students with Homework and Academic Support/ Tutoring.

    Tuesday/ Wednesday/ Thursday     3:05-5:00  & Saturday   9:00-12:00

     

    Please contact Harriet Barnes 531-299-7722, if you are requesting homework for your child's illness more than 3 day of absence. (Please allow teachers 24 hours to gather work.)

    Please contact Assistant Principal Julie Johnson 531-299-7701, to approve long term absences.

     

    Club or Organization Sponsor (s) Contact Information Meeting Time and Place




    Academic Decathlon Mrs. Zimmerman mindy.dauner@ops.org See Mrs. Zimmerman (Dauner) for specifics
    Anime Club Ms.Rowland rachel.rowland@ops.org Every other Tuesday after school in room 366
    Art Club Mr. Bacome robert.bacome@ops.org Every Wednesday after school in room 544
    AP Language & Composition Book Club Ms. Hike sarah.hike@ops.org See Ms. Hike for specifics
    Asian Youth Leadership Club Mr. Friedel matthew.friedel@ops.org During Advisement and select Wednesdays
    Character In Action Mr. Curtis matthew.curtis@ops.org Every Thursday before school in room 148

    Mr. Perez antonio.perez@ops.org
    A Cappella Ensemble Mr. Gruttemeyer tyler.gruttemeyer@ops.org Every Wednesday after school in room 148
    Academic Decathlon Ms. Dauner mindy.dauner@ops.org Wednesday after school room 148
    Card Club Mr. Hannah john.hannah@ops.org Every Monday after school in room 233
    Cheer Team Ms. Talamantes kimberly.talamantes@ops.org Practice is every Wednesday in room 465
    Chess Club Mr. Rail robert.rail@ops.org Wednesday after school in room 228
    CIA (Character In Action) Mr. Curtis mathew.curtis@ops.org Thursday Morning

    Mr. Perez antonio.perez@ops.org
    Cru Club (Student Faith-Based Group) Mr. Hoschar shawn.hoschar@ops.org Every Monday 4-5pm in rm 447
    DECA Ms. Zamiska jeanne.zamiska@ops.org Wednesday after school in room 228
    Dual Language Club Leticia Rojas leticia.rojas@ops.org Monday after school in the Cafeteria

    Octavio Sordo octavio.sordo@ops.org
    Fashion Club Ms. Ermel julie.ermel@ops.org 2nd Tuesday of each month in room 328
    Freedom Writers Ms. Palmesano cara.palmesano@ops.org See Ms. Palmesano in 364 for information

    Ms. Obner tara.obner@ops.org
    French Club Blake Doyle blake.doyle@ops.org Every Tuesday after school in room 468
    Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) Ms. Mustoe chelsea.mustoe@ops.org TBA- See Ms. Mustoe for specifics
    Gay Straight Alliance (GSA) Ms. McClellan carol.mcclellan@ops.org Every Thursday after school in room 262

    Mr. Stepp aaron.stepp@ops.org
    Guitar Club Mr. Austin joshua.austin@ops.org Every other Tuesday after school in room 248
    Goodfellas Skateboard Team Mr. Frison lend.frison@ops.org See Mr. Frison in room 361 for information
    Habitat Garden Ms. Waugh sara.waugh@ops.org See Ms. Waugh for details/information
    JROTC Mr. Sorensen thomas.sorensen@ops.org
    Latino Leaders Mr. Castellanos cesar.castellanos@ops.org Every Thursday after school in room 442

    Mr. Gutierrez gabrielle.gutierrez@ops.org
    Louder Than a Bomb (LTAB) Ms. McClellan carol.mcclellan@ops.org Day is TBA- once a week in room 362
    Luvabulls- Dance Team Ms. Taylor halley.taylor@ops.org See Ms. Taylor or Ms. Wheeler for information

    Ms. Wheeler kimberly.wheeler@ops.org
    Math Club Mr. Benak richard.benak@ops.org Need to contact Mr. Benak Directly for info.
    National Honor Society Ms. Zbylut-Birky josephine.zbylut-birky@ops.org 2nd and 4th Tuesday of each month
    Nebraska Naturalists Ms. Schlecht allison.schlecht@ops.org Tuesdays after school in room 363

    Ms. Allman mary.allman@ops.org

    Mr. Doyle blake.doyle@ops.org
    Next Chapter Book Club Ms. Hugelman jamie.hugleman@ops.org Thursday after school in room 342
    Packer Peace Group Ms. Synowiecki michelle.synowiecki@ops.org 1st and 3rd Wednesday in the counseling office

    Mr. Herrera emilio.herrera@ops.org
    Pottery Open Studio Ms. Gilreath julia.gilreath@ops.org Every Wednesday after school in room 543
    Powerlifting Club Mr. Busteed bryan.busteed@ops.org Winter Activity
    Publishing Boundaries in Tech. Club Mr. Kues robert.kues@ops.org Wednesday after school in room 432
    Robotics Mr. Hale michael.hale@ops.org
    *** Sports Mr. Mitchell (AD) dennis.mitchell@ops.org *** Sports and coaches at bottom of chart
    Thrive Club Mr. Cangas juan.cangas@ops.org
    Sign Language Club Mr. O'Connell daniel.oconnell@ops.org See Mr. O'Connell for information (NEW CLUB)
    Thespian Troupe #7863 Mr. Barratt kevin.barratt@ops.org
    UNO Echo (STEM) Club Ms. Ortiz mariateresa.ortiz@ops.org Wednesdays after school in room 228
    *** Sports Mr. Mitchell (AD) Golf - Mrs. Zimmerman/Dauner Basketball - Mr. Stessman/Ms. Gunn


    Wrestling - Mr. Sidzyik Softball - Ms. Suhr


    Cross Country - Mr. Tripp Soccer - Mr. Maass/Ms. Adler


    Powerlifting - Mr. Busteed Baseball - Mr. Felise


    Tennis-Mr. Mullen/Ms. Mustoe Football - Mr. Fant


    Swimming - Mr. LeMense Track - Mr. Moore/Mrs. Anderson/Mr. Tripp


    Volleyball - Ms. Moran

     

    Researching Colleges

    PROCEDURES FOR APPLYING TO A COLLEGE/SCHOLARSHIP

    1. Go to official college websites and complete college/scholarship application.
    2. Fill out and return all the appropriate paperwork to the secretary in the guidance office. 

    If materials need to be mailed, students must provide an envelope, correct mailing address, and enough postage for all materials that will be sent to the school or scholarship committee.  If the college or scholarship requires an official transcript, there is a $2 processing fee.  The student must fill out this information and personally bring this sheet into guidance and hand it to the guidance secretary.  Because we may need to follow up with additional questions and information, we will not accept these sheets sent through the mail. 

      

    THE COMMON APPLICATION

    The Common Application is an organization over 500 colleges and universities from all over the country. It was originally created to use the same standardized application at any of the member institutions. Membership is limited to colleges and universities that evaluate students using a holistic selection process. To find out which institutions use the Common Application visit commonapp.org.


    THE COMMON BLACK APPLICATION

    The Common Black Application allows students to apply to dozens of black colleges at once and pay a one time fee.  The use of the EDU, Inc. Online Application increases educational options by allowing students to receive acceptance letters, financial aid packages, and scholarship offers from several different colleges. To find out which institutions use the Common Black Application, commonblackcollegeapp.com.

    NAVIANCE FAMILY CONNECTION

    Naviance Family Connectionis a computer program for all students and families that assists in students' course planning, career goals, and college research.  Students and families have access to their Family Connection account wherever they have an internet connection.  Students will also collaborate with counselors and teachers in developing an individualized plan for future coursework, education after high school, and career options.

     

     

    COLLEGE SEARCH ENGINES

    Collegeboard, the company that designs the SAT, has a widely used search engine that can prove to be very beneficial. The database starts with almost 4000 colleges and eliminates schools based on a student’s choices of what they want in a college (size, major, clubs, etc.).

    College Navigator is a government website that was created by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), which is the primary federal entity for collecting and analyzing data related to education.

    YOUniversity  is a website that has 4-7 minute videos of college campuses around the country.  For those students interested in a college that is too far away to visit on the weekends, this is a great website to get more information and see what the college looks like. 

     

    EXPLORING MAJORS

    EducationQuest has an Index of Majors that will show what majors are offered at each college or university in the state of Nebraska. Use this beneficial website to find out if the school you are researching carries your program of interest.

     

    MIDWEST STUDENT EXCHANGE PROGRAM
    The Midwest Student Exchange Program is a helpful way to students to attend other schools outside Nebraska and make them more affordable. The states that participate in the MSEP are Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and Wisconsin. This is a wonderful program and is worth researching! Keep in mind as well that although some schools may participate in the MSEP, it also varies depending on the program of study. For more information, visit http://msep.mhec.org/ or contact the participating school.

     

    HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGES

    Historically Black Colleges are institutions of higher education in the United States that were established prior to 1964 with the intention of serving the African American community. HBCUs offer all students, regardless of race, an opportunity to develop their skills and talents. HBCUs enroll 14 percent of all African American students in higher education, however, they only make up 3 percent of America’s 4,084 institutions of higher education. There are 110 historically black colleges in the United States, which includes both two-year and four-year institutions. 

     

    WOMEN'S COLLEGES

    Women's Colleges are institutions of higher education that can offer a conducive environment for women.

     

    PROCEDURES FOR APPLYING TO A COLLEGE/SCHOLARSHIP

    1. Go to official college websites and complete college/scholarship application.
    2. Fill out and return all the appropriate paperwork to the secretary in the guidance office. 

    If materials need to be mailed, students must provide an envelope, correct mailing address, and enough postage for all materials that will be sent to the school or scholarship committee.  If the college or scholarship requires an official transcript, there is a $2 processing fee.  The student must fill out this information and personally bring this sheet into guidance and hand it to the guidance secretary.  Because we may need to follow up with additional questions and information, we will not accept these sheets sent through the mail. 

      

    THE COMMON APPLICATION

    The Common Application is an organization over 500 colleges and universities from all over the country. It was originally created to use the same standardized application at any of the member institutions. Membership is limited to colleges and universities that evaluate students using a holistic selection process. To find out which institutions use the Common Application visit commonapp.org.


    THE COMMON BLACK APPLICATION

    The Common Black Application allows students to apply to dozens of black colleges at once and pay a one time fee.  The use of the EDU, Inc. Online Application increases educational options by allowing students to receive acceptance letters, financial aid packages, and scholarship offers from several different colleges. To find out which institutions use the Common Black Application, commonblackcollegeapp.com.

    ESSAY WRITING

    Essay Writing is required for some colleges and scholarship committees. CollegeAdmissionsEssays.com offers some great tips in regards to strategies, topics, and helpful tips to make sure you are writing an essay to the best of your abilities.

     

    PROCEDURES FOR LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION

    Students are requested to complete a Teacher Recommendation Request Form to assist teachers in writing effective letters of recommendation.  This form (found in the Counseling Center, the above Post-secondary Planning Guide, and on Naviance Family Connection) serves to assist teachers in writing a letter on a student's behalf.  Seniors are encouraged to ask a staff member for a positive letter of recommendation if such a document is needed for college admission or a scholarship application.  Students should give 3 or 4 weeks (minimum) of advance notice to ensure that their teacher has enough time to write a quality letter.  Once the teacher completes the letter of recommendation, he or she will upload the document to Naviance Succeed where it is stored and made accessible to a school counselor.  Students request this task through Naviance Family Connection under “Colleges I’m Applying To” -- this action gives a teacher the ability to upload the letter.  Depending on the college or scholarship application, it may be necessary provide a copy of a letter of recommendation to the Counseling Department.  A letter will be placed in a student's Senior Application File and will be available for later use.  If a student needs a copy sent directly to a college or scholarship committee from a teacher recommended, please provide the teacher with a stamped, addressed envelope and alert the assigned counselor that the teacher will be mailing the letter of recommendation instead.

     

     

    SENIOR COLLEGE PLANNING GUIDE

    Senior College Planning Guide is a resource that students receive each fall in their senior English class. This is a comprehensive handbook that serves to explain the different steps and procedures in the college and scholarship application process.  Seniors and families are encouraged to consult this planning guide frequently this year as they seek information on college admissions, financial aid, college resources, and NCAA and/or NAIA eligibility.  This document is also located in the 'document library' on Family Connection.

     

    CONSENT TO SEND DOCUMENTS

    All seniors receive a transcript/recommendation waiver/consent form when counselors visit their senior English class during first semester. Additional forms are available in the Counseling Center or on Naviance Family Connection.  This transcript waiver/consent form needs to be completed in compliance with federal FERPA law, and kept on file in the Counseling Center. The transcript release form must be signed by students and parents giving South High School permission to release transcripts and letters of recommendation to colleges, universities, or scholarship committees.  The aforementioned waiver/consent form must be on file in the Counseling Center before student documents may be sent to outside institutions or organizations.

     

    COLLEGE FUNDING ESTIMATOR

    The College Funding Estimator is a helpful resource from EducationQuest's website that can help families predict whether a student qualifies for a federal Pell Grant through the U.S. Department of Education.   The funding estimator serves to estimate one's expected family contribution (EFC), a statistic that colleges and universities look at when establishing a financial aid package.  In addition, there are some need-based scholarships distributed by the Burke Scholarship Committee that require a documented EFC.  The South High Scholarship Application (made available in December) requires a completed College Funding Estimator as part of the application process.

     
     

    COMPARING COLLEGES

    College Comparison Worksheets give students an opportunity to research specific categories of different schools and compare them next to each other to see which one is the best fit for them. The Minnesota Office of Higher Education has developed an excellent resource to be able to compare several categories among three different schools.

     

     

     

    SCHOLARSHIP List can be found on NAVIANCE

    Scholarship Saturday's

    Counselor's are available to help with FAFSA, Scholarships, Applying to College

    9:00- 12:00 Every Saturday in the Library

    NAVIANCE

    Naviance Family Connection is the computer based program that will be utilized by South High to communicate numerous scholarship options for OPS seniors.  Click on the 'college' tab to view the district scholarship list at the bottom of the page.  Access Naviance Family Connection via the front page of the South High website - click on the icon that says Naviance.  A student's username is his or her 6 digit student ID number; the password is his or her 8 digit birthday.  Students are encouraged to change their password each semester by clicking on 'manage my account' at the top of the page.


     

     

     

     

    AWARD LETTERS

    An award letter is the statement from either a college or scholarship committee that gives information about scholarship(s) that have been offered to a student. 

     

    Victor from EdQuest will be at South Friday, Dec. 15th to assist with the FAFSA and the College Funding Estimator.  Please contact the Counseling Office to set up an appointment (531)299-2817. 
    Things you will need: create an FSA ID (student and parent) and 2016 tax returns

    Please check your college/university for priority deadline for FAFSA completion.  Deadline is usually April 1st for most schools but some schools have earlier deadlines. Special note: You do not need to have final tax information to complete the FAFSA – students can use estimated numbers but you will have to correct the FAFSA when your tax information is available.

    Collegebound Nebraska

    Students who are Pell eligible can receive the remainder of tuition cost for UNK, UNL or UNO through Collegebound Nebraska.  Students must be admitted and submit FAFSA by April 1st
     
    NSCS Advantage
    First-time freshmen students who receive a federal Pell Grant pay No Tuition at Wayne State, Peru State. or Chadron State College through the NSCS Advantage program.  Students must be admitted and submit FAFSA by June 1st.

    AgoraPulse Social Media Management Scholarship

    Dec. 15

    Augustana University, Academic Scholarships

    Dec. 15

    AXA Achievement Scholarship

    Dec. 15

    Burger King McLamore Fndn, Burger King Scholars Program

    Dec. 15

    Foot Locker Scholar Athletes

    Dec. 15

    Lead Roster B2B Sales & Marketing Scholarship

    Dec. 15

    Publicity.ai SEO & Content Marketing Scholarship

    Dec. 15

    UNO, College of Business Administration Academy Scholarship

    Dec. 15

    UNO/Peter Kiewit Institute, Walter Scott Jr.  Scholarship

    Dec. 15

    Centris Member Scholarship

    Dec. 31

    CrossLites Scholarship

    Dec. 31

    NILRR, William B. Ruggles Right to Work Journalism Scholarship

    Dec. 31

    U.S. Navy, Marines ROTC Scholarship

    Dec. 31

    U.S. Navy, Navy ROTC Nurse Scholarship

    Dec. 31

     

     EDUCATIONQUEST

    EducationQuest is an organization dedicated to helping students with scholarships and financial aid.  This nonprofit organization is a very helpful, free resources. In Omaha, its location is 11031 Elm Street (in Rockbrook Village at 108th & West Center Road). To set up an appointment, call 402-391-4033. 

    There are two very beneficial tools on EducationQuest's website that help make preparing for the FAFSA easier:  the College Funding Estimator and the FAFSA tutorial. The College Funding Estimator calculates a family's Expected Family Contribution (EFC) and also provides an estimate of possible Pell Grant awards if a family qualifies. The FAFSA tutorial is another helpful resource that will help walk you through each question on the form. The FAFSA contains several pages of questions - some of which can be complicated.  The FAFSA tutorials and handouts found at www.educationquest.org are certainly helpful!  

    FAFSA

    The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is a form that students/parents complete annually to determine eligibility for federal student aid; this includes Pell Grants, Stafford Loans, PLUS loans, and Work Study programs.  Available after January 1 each year, FAFSA processes several million financial aid applications and distributes billions of dollars each year.  In addition to financial assistance on a federal level, most states and colleges also use information from the FAFSA to award student aid.  It is recommended that students and families review financial aid deadlines for the prospective schools in their list; March 1, March 15, and April 1 are common deadlines for federal financial aid.  Applications submitted after stated deadlines are not guaranteed financial aid.  FAFSA deadlines vary from college to college; it is in your best interest to contact prospective colleges for more details.


    Students and parents filling out the FAFSA are required to sign up for a FAFSA PIN. The PIN acts as an electronic signature and allows both students and parents to legally sign the forms over the computer. The student and parent have to have their own unique FAFSA PIN and you can apply for one before you apply for the FAFSA.

    FAFSA Instructions - Watch the video below for information on filing out your FAFSA.
    FAFSA

    nQuest is an organization dedicated to helping students with scholarships and financial aid.  This nonprofit organization is a very helpful, free resources. In Omaha, its location is 11031 Elm Street (in Rockbrook Village at 108th & West Center Road). To set up an appointment, call 402-391-4033. 

    There are two very beneficial tools on EducationQuest's website that help make preparing for the FAFSA easier:  the College Funding Estimator and the FAFSA tutorial. The College Funding Estimator calculates a family's Expected Family Contribution (EFC) and also provides an estimate of possible Pell Grant awards if a family qualifies. The FAFSA tutorial is another helpful resource that will help walk you through each question on the form. The FAFSA contains several pages of questions - some of which can be complicated.  The FAFSA tutorials and handouts found at www.educationquest.org are certainly helpful!  

    FAFSA

    The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is a form that students/parents complete annually to determine eligibility for federal student aid; this includes Pell Grants, Stafford Loans, PLUS loans, and Work Study programs.  Available after January 1 each year, FAFSA processes several million financial aid applications and distributes billions of dollars each year.  In addition to financial assistance on a federal level, most states and colleges also use information from the FAFSA to award student aid.  It is recommended that students and families review financial aid deadlines for the prospective schools in their list; March 1, March 15, and April 1 are common deadlines for federal financial aid.  Applications submitted after stated deadlines are not guaranteed financial aid.  FAFSA deadlines vary from college to college; it is in your best interest to contact prospective colleges for more details.


    Students and parents filling out the FAFSA are required to sign up for a FAFSA PIN. The PIN acts as an electronic signature and allows both students and parents to legally sign the forms over the computer. The student and parent have to have their own unique FAFSA PIN and you can apply for one before you apply for the FAFSA.


    FAFSA Instructions - Watch the video below for information on filing out your FAFSA.
    FAFSA



    FINANCIAL AID TOOLS AND THE NEBRASKA OPPORTUNITY GRANT

    The Financial Aid Calculator gives students an opportunity to see how much money they might have to save up for loans and to be able to calculate college costs based on inflation.

    The Financial Aid Estimator is a helpful way to get a quick estimate of your Expected Family Contribution (EFC). It is not as accurate as the College Funding Estimator from EducationQuest but it is a lot easier to use. Keep in mind that the FAFSA is the final resource that determines what the official EFC is and whether you are Pell Grant eligible.
    The State of Nebraska offers a grant opportunity for some students who apply to a Nebraska college or university.  The Nebraska Opportunity Grant (NOG) is awarded though post-secondary institutions within the state.  Students are encouraged to apply early and complete their FAFSA before the deadlines established by each institution in order to give themselves the best chance to receive a Nebraska Opportunity Grant.

     

    WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT FINANCIAL AID

    The Guide to Federal Student Aid is a document put out by the U.S. Department of Education.  This manual will give all the information on grants, work study, loans and other topics with regard to federal financial aid.

     

     

     

    First Generation and Underserved College Bound Students

    OPPORTUNITIES AT SOUTH HIGH SCHOOL
    Students that participate in the federal free/reduced lunch program can receive up to two fee waivers to take the ACT or SAT free of charge.  Come down to the Counseling Center and ask your counselor to fill out an ACT or SAT fee waiver form for you.  The form is good for either the regular ACT, the ACT writing plus, or the SAT. 

    Additionally, most colleges understand that high school seniors who meet the financial eligibility guidelines (such as participating in the federal free/reduced school lunch program) should be able to apply to colleges free of charge.  Eligible seniors can request their counselor to send a application fee waiver letter to most all colleges who charge an application fee - be sure to note this request on the blue College/Scholarship Processing Form.

     

    FINANCIAL AID

    • There are literally thousands of scholarships out there for high school seniors that show financial need. One of the first steps is to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) after Jan 1 of one's senior year.  This is a federal government service and is completely free.  It is a document that you can do online that requires both the student and the parent's tax information. Go to EducationQuest to get a checklist for FAFSA materials.  If you need additional help completing the FAFSA,set up an appointment with EducationQuest by calling 391-4033. They are a nonprofit organization located at Rockbrook Village at 108th & W. Center Road and there services are also completely free.
    • Once you have completed your information, you will receive your Expected Family Contribution (EFC) and also find out if you qualify for a Pell Grant.  The EFC is a amount of money that the federal government expects you to contribute to college.  For example if your EFC is $2,000, the family would have to pay up to $2,000 and the rest of the finances for college could be covered through grants, work studies, and loans. Students would have ways to afford college and be able to make payments after they graduate.  College / higher education is an investment and it might be worth your while the research on the different opportunities that are out there. 
    • After the FAFSA is complete, your score is sent out to the schools that you have indicated you are interested in attending.  The financial aid officers at the schools will look at your information and assess your financial aid package based of the FAFSA and also your college application.  You will have until May 1 to choose the one school you wish to attend.

     

     

    Information for Prospective Student-Athletes

    IMPORTANCE OF ACADEMICS

    Many athletes falsely believe they can make it to college based on their athletic ability alone. Although an athlete may be talented, he or she will have a very difficult time advancing to the next level without passing the required high school classes, maintaining a minimum core grade point average and achieving sufficient standardized test scores. 

    Academics are important in regard to recruiting and scholarships. Strong academics are impressive to college coaches. Coaches only recruit a limited number of high school athletes and good grades can help an athlete standout just as much as athletic ability. Furthermore, grades are often a major factor in awarding scholarships between two athletes with equal talent. Athletes are an investment to coaches and universities. Grades are a vital factor in staying academically eligible in college and ultimately graduating from the university.

     

    TYPES OF COLLEGE SPORTS 

    Fall Season

    Cross Country (M & W)

    Field Hockey (W)

    Football (M)

    Soccer (M & W)

    Volleyball (M & W)

    Water Polo (M)

     

    Winter Season

    Basketball (M & W)

    Bowling (W)

    Fencing (M & W)

    Gymnastics (M & W)

    Ice Hockey (M & W)

    Rifle (M & W)

    Skiing (M & W)

    Swimming and Diving (M & W)

    Track, Indoor (M & W)

    Wrestling (M)

     

    Spring Season

    Baseball (M)

    Golf (M & W)

    Lacrosse (M & W)

    Rowing (W)

    Softball (W)

    Tennis (M & W)

    Track (M & W)

    Volleyball (M)

    Water Polo (W)


    RESEARCHING COLLEGE TEAMS BY SPORT

    Link Athletics is a great website to learn about college sports by researching specific sports by state and by school.

     

    COLLEGE ATHLETIC ORGANIZATIONS

    The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) is an association for college sports that has been around since 1906. There are over 1,000 four-year member colleges in the United States that compete at the Division (I), Division (II), and Division (II) level.

     

    The National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) is an association for college sports that has been around since 1940. There are nearly 300 four-year member colleges in the United States and Canada.

     

    The National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) is an association for college sports that has been around since 1938. There are about 500 two-year colleges in the United States

     

    The National Christian College Athletic Association (NCCAA) is an association for college sports that has been around since 1966. There are about 102 four-year colleges in the United States. 

     

    NCAA & NAIA ELIGIBILITY CENTERS

    The NCAA Eligibility Center is the governing body that determines whether a student will be allowed to compete in NCAA Division (I) or Division (II) athletics.

    The NCAA Freshman-Eligibility Quick Reference gives information on the general core courses it takes to qualify for Division (I) and Division (II) athletics.  This website outlines eligibility guidelines for prospective student-athletes of NCAA institutions.
    The NAIA Eligibility Center is the governing body that determines eligibility for prospective student-athletes who hope to participate at a member institution.  

    Prospective student-athletes who plan on participating at either an NCAA (DI or DII) or NAIA member institution must register with the respective organization in order to be eligible to participate in an intercollegiate sport once on campus.

     

     

     

     

    Silina Branson
    Career Counselor
    silina.branson@ops.org

    Thang Tran
    Career Counselor
    thang.tran@ops.org

    Steve Carlson
    Career Counselor
    steve.carlson@ops.org

    Job Corps - Careers Begin Here

    Iowa Denison Job Corps

    Pine Ridge Job Corps

    Job Corps Serves Low-Income Young Adults

    To qualify for job corps, students must be…

    16 to 24
    years old

    16 to 24-year-olds ready to work toward a successful future are welcome. The maximum age limit may be waived if the applicant is a person with a documented disability. For minors, a parent or guardian must sign a consent form.

    In need of
    job skills

    The applicant faces one or more barriers to employment like needing additional career technical training, education, counseling, and/or assistance to complete regular schoolwork or to secure and maintain employment.

    Low-income
    Eligible

    Applicants must meet one or more of these conditions: receives public assistance, earns poverty-level income, is homeless, is a foster child, or qualifies for free or reduced-price lunch. Your admissions counselor will help you determine your eligibility.

    Able to Work
    in the USA

    The applicant is a legal resident of the U.S. or a U.S territory or a lawfully admitted permanent resident alien, refugee, asylee, parolee, or immigrant who has been authorized by the U.S. attorney general to work in the United States.

    Bricklaying

    Average salary: $49,000 per year

    Length of training: 8-12 months

    Bricklayers build and repair walls, mix cement, create mortar, cut and fit bricks, use plumb lines, and spirit levels to check for accuracy and the use of specialty tools.

     Construction

    Tile Setting

    Average salary: $40,000 per year

    Length of training: 8-12 months

    Tile setters are responsible for installing tile on walls, ceilings, floors, and other surfaces in buildings and residences.

     

    Cement Masonry

    Average salary: $38,000 per year

    Length of training: 8-12 months

    As a cement mason, your job will include filling roads, driveways, sidewalks, bridges, foundations, and parking lots with cement. You will also make concrete beams, columns, and panels.

     

    Carpentry

    Average salary: $42,000 per year

    Length of training: 8-12 months

    Carpenters build things like wood buildings, floor systems, roof framing, walls, ceiling, windows, and molding. Responsibility for following blueprints is expected as well.

     

    Facility Maintenance

    Average salary: $35,000 per year

    Length of training: 8-12 months

    Facilities maintenance workers perform routine repairs and preventive maintenance to ensure building systems operate efficiently.

    Learn More

    Green Job

     

     Healthcare

    Clinical Medical Assistant

    Average salary: $31,000 per year

    Length of training: 8-12 months

    Medical assistants perform a variety of duties to assist healthcare professionals including scheduling appointments, taking vital signs, succinctly conveying ideas and information to patients. People who work in this field should be good listeners, be able to handle stress, and excel at thinking clearly on the fly.

    Learn More

     

    Facility Maintenance

    Average salary: $35,000 per year

    Length of training: 8-12 months

    Facilities maintenance workers perform routine repairs and preventive maintenance to ensure building systems operate efficiently.

      

    Healthcare

    Nurse Assistant/ Home Health Aide

    Average salary: $26,000 per year

    Length of training: 8-12 months

    Home health aides are non-licensed members of the home care team that assist patients who wish to receive care in the comfort of their own home with daily living.

    Learn More

     

    Healthcare

    Pharmacy Technician

    Average salary: $30,000 per year

    Length of training: 8-12 months

    Under the direction of a pharmacist, a pharmacy technician will measure, mix, count out, label, and prepare medications. They also often interact with pati

     

     

     

    Painting

    Average salary: $37,000 per year

    Length of training: 8-12 months

    Painters prepare and paint interior and exterior surfaces on residential and commercial properties. Most painters learn their trade on the job or through an apprenticeship.

     

     

     

    Welding

    Average salary: $37,000 per year

    Length of training: 8-12 months

    Participants will learn the most commonly utilized welding processes including welding terminology, weld design, welding safety, electrical theory, the weldability of metals, and welding quality control.

     

     

     

     

     

     Military Learn About Your Options

     Learn About Your Options

    ·  

    The Military is comprised of 12 branches: five Active Duty and seven part-time duty.

    Full time

    Full-time members of the Military are immersed in military culture. They live on base, in military housing or in civilian communities.

    Active Duty

    Active Duty is a similar time commitment to working at a full-time civilian job. Active-duty service members live on base or in military housing and immersed in military culture. After attending boot camp, they are stationed at a base either domestically or overseas. Active-duty terms typically last two to six years. The length of deployment varies depending on a unit's specific mission.

    Part time

    Part-time service members attend boot camp and train one weekend a month and two weeks a year, allowing them time to pursue a civilian career or college. Part-time service options fall under two types: Reserve and National Guard.

    Reserve
    Reservists are part-time service members who maintain trained units at home while active-duty service members are deployed. Each active-duty branch of the Military has a Reserve component under their command, which is available for active-duty deployment in times of war or national emergency. Some active-duty service members switch to the Reserve to finish out their service commitment.

    National Guard

    The Guard are part-time service members whose main focus is on homeland security and humanitarian relief. National Guard units assist communities in their state during emergencies like storms, floods, fires and other natural disasters.

    The two Guard branches, Army National Guard and the Air National Guard, are made up of 54 separate organizations: one for each of the 50 states, U.S.-owned territories and the District of Columbia. Each group goes by its state name (for example, the New York National Guard) and reports to that state's governor. During times of conflict, the president can federalize the National Guard and its service members can be deployed overseas.

    National Guard service members deployed overseas may see combat, but are also assigned noncombat humanitarian tasks, such as building schools and hospitals, training local peacekeepers and other community-building projects.


     Omaha Exploring Job Shadow

    What is Exploring

    Exploring is a career education program for young men and women who are 14 through 20-years-old. Adults are selected by the participating organization for involvement in the program. Color, race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, ethnic background, economic status, and citizenship are not criteria for participation.

    The purpose of this program is to provide experiences which help young people mature and to prepare them to become responsible and caring adults. Explorers are ready to investigate the meaning of interdependence in their personal relationships and communities.

    Exploring is based on a unique and dynamic relationship between youth and the organizations in their communities. Local community organizations initiate an Explorer post by matching their people and program resources to the interests of young people in the community. The result is a program of activities that helps youth pursue their special interests, grow, and develop.

    Explorer Posts can specialize in a variety of career skills. Exploring programs are based on five areas of emphasis: career opportunities, life skills, citizenship, character education, and leadership experience.

    If you are interested in learning how to get involved or if you would like to sign up for one of our career Explorer Posts, click here to contact us today!


    All Programs

    Culinary Arts Program

    Veterinary Science Program

    UNL Durham School of Architecture Engineering & Construction

    Leo A Daly

    UNO Aviation Program

    Metropolitan Community College Career Training Programs

    Valmont – Columbus

    DLR Group

    HDR

    Metro Media Production Careers (Cinema, Motion Graphics, Sound, Television and Video)

    UNO Computer Science Program

    Kaplan Cyber Security Program

    Creative Communication & Art Program

    Omaha World Herald Program

    UNO Event Planning & Communications Program

    Children’s Hospital & Medical Center Program

    Creighton Pharmacy One-Day Program

    Trauma Thursday and CHI Health

    Clarkson College

    Creighton Exercise Science Program

    Creighton University Dental Program

    Kaplan Dental Assisting

    The Nebraska Medical Center, Methodist Hospital & OrthoNebraska Program

    Easter Seals

    Douglas County Sheriff’s Program

    Omaha Fire Department Program

    Cass County Sheriff’s Office

    Ralston Fire Department

    Metropolitan Community College Fire Science Program

    Erickson Sederstrom Law Program

    Omaha Police Department

     


    Contact Us

    Exploring
    Mid-America Council
    12041 West Maple Road
    Omaha, NE  68164

    Tara Lopez
    Exploring Executive
    402.514.3065

    Sarah Wisecup
    Senior Exploring Executive
    402.514.3022

     

    Volunteer Opportunities

    There are many groups, organizations, schools, and charities in the area who need volunteers! When these organizations contact Burke to try to find volunteers we will place information about those opportunities here on this page. This is an effort for Burke students, parents, alumni, and those within our community to help fill these volunteer positions.



     

     

     

     

    Michelle Synowiecki 
    Personal/Social Counselor
    Email: Michelle.Synowiecki@ops.org

    Emilio Herrera
    Social Worker
    Email: emilio.herrera@ops.org

    Responsibilities:

    • Classroom Guidance on topics such as stress, decision making, transitions, and communication
    • Provide opportunities for Prejudice Elimination and Inclucity education
    • Teen parent resources
    • Crisis intervention
    • Transition from Middle School to High School
    • Small group opportunities for students dealing with anger, grief and loss, or family members living with illness and disease

     


     

     

    You don't have to face your problems alone!

    It's ok to ask for help Learn More

    Call  1-800-448-3000

    Chat

    Chat will be closed on Thanksgiving Day. If you need assistance, please call us or email us. www.yourlifeyourvoice.org

    Text  (VOICE To 20121)

    Texting will open on Thanksgiving Day from 6p‑1a CST.

    Email (YLYV@BOYSTOWN.ORG)

    Download  The "My Life My Voice" Mood App

    One World Teen/ Young Adult Health Center

    Address: 4310 S 24th St, Omaha, NE 68107

    Hours:10-7pm

    Phone: (402) 502-8880

     

    Boys Town South Omaha Office

    No reviews · Family Service Center

    4612 S 25th St

    (402) 734-0155

    Open until 6:00 PM



     Heartland Family Service


    (402) 552-7400 | info@HeartlandFamilyService.org

    Child & Family

    These community centers and services span the entire lifespan. From early childhood education programming to therapeutic intervention for troubled teens to social and nutritional offerings for seniors, participants in our programs receive education and support today in order to have a brighter future.

    Baby TALK

    Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)

    Family and Child Care Resource Center

    Healthy Alternatives for Little Ones (HALO)

    Jefferson House

    In-Home Services

    Positive Parenting Group (PPG)

    Ready in 5

    Refugee Juvenile Justice Advocate

    Ruth K. Solomon Girls Program

    Generations Center

    Victim Empathy

    Youth Links

     

     

    Nebraska Immigration Legal Assistance Hotline

    https://www.nilah.org/

    Phone Hours
    Horas Telefonicas

    Monday & Wednesday
    lunes y miercoles
    9:00–11:00, 12:30–3:30 CST

    Tuesday & Thursday
    martes y jueves
    9:00–12:00, 1:30–3:30 CST

    Friday
    viernes
    9:00–12:00 CST

    1.855.307.6730

    South Records Counseling Team:  Please Contact if you have any Questions

    Lagana, Laura

    Records

    G, K, X, Z

    laura.lagana

    531-299-7698

    Vidal, Rachelle

    Records

    A, V

    rachelle.vidal

    531-299-7666

     

    ·  2017-18 Course Catalog (NEW)

    ·  2016-17 Course Catalog (OLD)

    ·  2015-16 Course Catalog (OLD)

    To request your official transcript, please contact jeraldine.rodriguezordonez@ops.org or call 531-299-7677.

     Please provide her the following:

    1.  First and Last Name
    2. Graduation Year
    3. Birth Date
    4. Where the transcript can be sent

    Transcripts are not able to  be given directly to the student.